HOUSEHOLD HINTS 1940s STYLE.

 

Hints from this web page have now been used in Victoria Seymours Latest Book 

"
Austerity Letters from Lavendar Cottage"



PIPES

 

Leaking hot water pipes

 

Take some iron borings or fillings and mix them with enough vinegar to form a paste like mixture.

Dry the pipe thoroughly fill up the cracks when the leakage is found and keep the pipe dry until the paste has become quite hard.

 

 

TO PREVENT SINK PIPES CLOGGING

 

A lump of soda laid upon the sink pipe   down which waste water passes will prevent the clogging of the pipe with grease.

 

TO THAW FROZEN PIPES

 

Turn off the water at the main, turn the tap on full and pour boiling water over the pipe.

If this is not sufficient to melt the ice. Fill some bags with sand, heat them in the oven, then pack them round the pipe and leave them as long as they remain hot or until the ice melts.

 

TO RID SNOW FROM YOUR PATH

 

If you have had any heavy snow and have No Salt, but have a Coal Fire, why not put down HOT ASH from the bottom of your fire and put it down on the path, and see it Melt away.

Also make sure you do not put down by your car, as it can Melt your car tyres, it will also leave you with so




 

HOW TO MAKE YOUR OWN FURNITURE POLISH

 

It not to hard to make your own furniture polish.

In the top of a double boiler, or a pan which you are not using. Put 1 cup of turpentine with ½ cup of shredded beeswax.

Cook over boiling water stirring all the time, until the wax is melts.

When the mixture is completely cool, apply it with a soft cloth, then rub with a clean soft cloth. Any polish that is left may be stored in a jar with a tight fitting lid.

This can last you a long time as you only use a small bit each time.


THE USE OF FUEL IN WAR TIME

 

The coal stove or the open fire with an oven at the side, both of which are still in use in so many homes, for heating and for other household purposes, should supply all the accommodation required for the cooking. Often however gas, electricity (if you have electricity) or oil will be the only fuel in use, and in such cases the question of the question of the amount of these fuels consumed in cooking will be of particular importance. A few practical hints for economising in the various kinds of fuel may be found helpful.

 

HINTS WHICH APPLY TO ALL TYPES OF STOVES

1.       Understand thoroughly the stove in use and choose utensils which are suitable for it.

2.       Keep the stove and the utensils clean both inside and out.

3.       Do not leave pans uncovered except for   special reasons.

4.       Whenever possible make use of a steamer with several compartments .As  a   substitute, use a large saucepan partly fill it with water, and place in it covered basins or jars containing the various foods to be cooked.

5.       When the oven is hot make good use of it.

 

TO SAVE FIREWOOD AND MATCHES,

1.       Use newspaper fire – lighters and spills.

2.       When possible collect sticks and fir cones.

 

TO SAVE COAL

1.       If the firebox has a movable bottom adjust it according to the amount of heat required. If too large, reduce its size with fire bricks.

2.       for soups and stews have a small fire and either cook on the top of the stove, beside the fire, or in the oven.

3.       When not required for cooking, bank up the fire with wet coal dust, and damp crumpled newspaper. Burn refuse which is of no use for live stock or garden.

4.       Make briquettes from coal dust by damping the dust and packing it in the bags or cartons in which sugar is bought.

5.       Sift all cinders and use again.

 

NOTE

Coke should only be used in a stove with a closed fire.

 

TO SAVE GAS

1.       Do not use a large burner if a small one can do.

2.       Never allow the gas flame to flicker up the sides of kettle or saucepan.

3.       When using the grill always place a saucepan or kettle on the top of it.

4.       To cook a meal on one gas burner, place a sheet of iron or an asbestos mat on the top of the burner. By this means the heat obtained will be sufficient to cook the food in two or three pans. If a gas ring only is available, the same results can be arrived at if the ring is placed on an old metal tray, built round with bricks, and a sheet of iron placed on the top.

5.       Turn off the gas immediately after use.

 

TO SAVE ELECTRICITY.

1.       Use flat bottomed saucepans large enough to cover the boiling plates, and place them on the stove before switching on the current. Two or three saucepans will boil or simmer on one boiling plate.

2.       When using either boiling plates or oven, switch to “low" as soon as the necessary temperature has been reached. Turn to “ off “ before the cooking is finished, as an electric stove holds heat for some time after the current has been switched off.

3.       Do not waste this retained heat but use it for additional cooking to heat water, etc.

4.       Use the solid boiling plate or boiler, griller as a girdle. Grease before use and switch to “low”

 

TO SAVE OIL

1.       Buy oil of good quality.

2.       Keep the lamp wicks carefully trimmed.

3.       Use saucepans which completely cover the burners.

4.       Regulate the flame as required and extinguish it as soon as the cooking is finished.


 

TO LAUNDER AN EIDERDOWN

 

Eiderdowns although large and bulky, can be washed quite successfully at home.

Fill a small bath with warm soapsuds, prepared soap flakes provide the easiest method.

Put the quilt into the bath and squeeze until the water is dirty.

Then make fresh soapsuds and repeat the process once more.

If the eiderdown is very dirty a third bathful is usually necessary.

To rinse squeeze the quilt again and again in clean warm water until every particle of soap is removed.

Squeeze out as much water as possible then hang out in the air to dry.

 

 

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